134th Infantry Regiment Crest

134th Infantry Regiment

"All Hell Can't Stop Us"

35th Infantry Division emblem

35th Infantry Division

Report of Action Against the Enemy - September 1944

Headquarters 35th Infantry Division
A.P.O. #35, U. S. Army
9 October 1944

SUJECT: Action Against the Enemy Report.

TO: The Adjutant General, Washington, D.C.

1. In compliance with C-3, Par. 10, AR 345-105, the following report of action against the enemy by the 35th Infantry Division during the period of 1 September 1944 to 30 September 1944, inclusive, is submitted.

2. On 1 September 1944, Task Force S, commanded by Brigadier General Edmund B. Sebree, moved the bulk of its forces to an assembly area near Brienne-Le-Chateau. The Task Force, consisting of CT 320; 737th Tk Bn; 654th TD Bn (minus Co B and two Platoons) and supported by the 182d F.A. Gp., had as its mission to protect the southeast flank of the 35th Infantry Division and to be prepared to counter-attack or attack from its present position to the northeast, east and southeast. The 3905 QM Trkg Co and the 35th Cav. Recon. Trp. (minus one platoon) were attached and the 802d F.A. Bn was placed in direct support. The 3d Bn 320 Infantry (with Co C and one platoon Recon Co. 654th TD Bn attached, and the 802 F.A. Bn in support) remained generally in their former position defending the line from Vandeure-Sur-Barse to Bar-Sur-Seine, and were prepared to demolish the bridge at Bar-Sur-Seine at the discretion of the Commander.

On 2 September 1944 CT 134 (with the 127th F.A. Bn attached) Divison Reserve, relieved the 320th Infantry of guarding captured German supplies at Sens, Villneuve and Troyes. CT 137 (with 255 F.A. Bn attached) continued protection of the south flank of XII Corps in their sector.

The 6th Armored Division, the following day, took over the responsibility of the sector as far east as Montargis, inclusive, and shared responsibility with the 35th Infantry Division for the sector between Montargis and Sens. CT 134, in Division Reserve, established patrols from Bar-Sur-Seine to make contact with the 6th Armored Division at Montargis. Task Force S moved the bulk of its forces to a new Assembly Area in the vicinity of Joinville. The 3d Bn 320 Infantry with attached and supporting units remained in vicinity of Vandeuvre awaiting relief by the 134th Infantry. The division continued its mission of protecting the south flank of the XII Corps west to Sens, inclusive.

CT 134 established patrols on 4 September 1944 to carry out the mission of protecting the south flank of the Division from Sens to Bar-Sur-Seine, and continued to patrol from Sens maintaining contact with the 6th Armored Division at Montargis.

On 4 September 1944 CT 137 (minus one Infantry Bn and the 219 F.A. Bn) moved to vicinity of Brienne, and took over the mission of protecting the south flank of the Division from Bar-Sur-Seine to Blaise. The 1st Bn relieved the 3d Bn 320 Infantry at 1740. The 219th F.A. Bn remained in vicinity of Montargis and prepared to move to the vicinity of Brienne.

Continuing its mission of protecting the south flank of the Division from Blaise to Joinville, Task Force S also prepared to attack northeast, east and southeast. The Division continued to protect the south flank of the XII Corps.

On 5 September 1944 the 691 TD Bn was attached to the 35th Infantry Division in the vicinity of Brienne.

CT 134 (with 127th F.A. Bn attached and the 255 F.A. Bn in direct support) continued to protect the south flank of Division from Sens to Bar-Sur-Seine and continued to patrol the area from Sens to contact the 6th Armored Division at Montargis. CT 137 (with Co C 654th TD Bn attached and the 802 F.A. Bn in direct support) continued its mission of protecting the south flank of the Division from Bar-Sur-Seinne to Blaise.

Establishing a Task Force Air Strip, Task Force S continued its mission of protecting the south flank of the Division from Blaise to Joinville, and prepared to attack northeast, east or southeast.

The 35th Infantry Division continued its mission of protecting the south flank of the XII Corps from Sens inclusive to Germay, inclusive. Patrols were established on the line from Auxerre-Chatillion-Chaumont-Rimicourt.

On 6 and 7 September 1944 the Division continued to protect the south flank of XII Corps from Sens to Germay, both inclusive, and its various elements maintained their respective missions and patrols as of 5 September 1944.

On 8 September 1944 the CT 134 (with the 127 F.A. Bn, 3905 QM Truck Co; 691 TD Bn and 35 Cavalry Reconnaissance Troop attached and the 255 F.A. Bn in support) began a movement to a new assembly area southwest of Nancy at 0600.

CT 137 (Co C 654 TD Bn attached and 802 F.A. Bn in support) continued the mission of protecting the south flank of the Division from Bar-Sur-Seine to Blaise.

Task Force S. continued its mission of protecting the south flank of the Division from Blaise to Joinville, prepared to attack northeast, east or southeast.

The 106 Cavalry Group was released from attachment from the 35th Infantry Division on 8 September 1944 at 1600.

The 691 TD Bn was released from attachment to the 35th Infantry Division on 9 September 1944 at 1600.

On 9 September 1944 CT 134 ceased at 0115 and all attachments were released. The 134th Infantry continued to protect the Division assembly area south of Toul pending the arrival of the Division. It occupied a fort on the west side of the Moselle River at 1630 with no opposition. The regiment advanced within its zone to secure a portion of the Division objective, and was protecting the north portion of the Division at 1200 on 10 September 1944.

The Division having assembled Southwest of Nancy, CT 137 and CT 320 ceased as of 1630 on 9 September 1944. At 1915 on that date the 320th Infantry established a road block with one reinforced platoon and one AT gun in order to guard the Division rear. The Regiment continued to protect the southwest flank of the Division.

On 10 September 1944 the 35th Infantry Division advancing against heavy mortar and artillery fire fought their way to the high ground southwest of the Moselle River, completing the mission on 11 September 1944.

On 10 September 1944 the 134th Infantry (with Co A 60th Engineer (C) Bn attached) pushed forward at 1800 against small arms, artillery and mortar fire to occupy the southwest bank of the Moselle River, and by 2230 the 2nd Bn had crossed the bridge over the river. At 0030 on 11 September 1944 there was a heavy enemy counter-attack against the Battalion accompanied by an attempt of the German Air Force to destroy the bridge. At 0130 the bridge was knocked out by enemy artillery and the 2nd Battalion undergoing an extremely heavy artillery barrage and a counter-attack by tanks and infantry, was forced to withdraw to the west bank of the river. On the same date Co A, repelling a counter-attack against Fort De Pont St. Vincent by an estimated enemy company, was reinforced by a company from 3rd Battalion, 134th Infantry at 1055. German casualties were very high in this engagement.

On 10 September 1944 the 137th Infantry (with Co B 60th Engineer (C) Battalion attached) advanced against scattered artillery fire to secure high ground west of the Moselle River and occupied the objective at 1700. On 11 September 1944 the Regiment seized a shallow bridgehead across the Moselle River at 0500. Parts of the 2nd and 3rd Battalions crossed the River where both were pinned down by small arms and artillery fire. These two battalions, however, held their ground.

On 11 September 1944, CCB 4th Armored Division (with the 2d Battalion 320th Infantry attached) moved through the 35th Infantry Division area to the south flank to make a crossing of the Moselle River on the right of the division.

On 11 September 1944 the 1st Battalion 134th Infantry (with Co K attached) was placed in a defensive position on the hill near Fort De Pont St. Vincent at 1600, and defended the Fort from counter-attacks.

It was reported at 0930 on 12 September 1944 that a bridge was being erected by the enemy about 800 yards about the Fort. By 1130 our artillery had knocked the bridge out.

On 11 September 1944 at 1730 the 137th Infantry (with Co B 60th Engineer (C) Battalion and Co B 737th Tank Battalion attached, and Co B 654th TD Battalion in support) attacking with three Battalions abreast, completed securing a bridgehead across the Moselle River. Under cover of friendly artillery fire elements of all three Battalions now had reached the east bank of the River. Troops continued to push forward aggressively, and by daylight on 12 September two Companies of the 1st Battalion were reorganizing at Phase Line 1. A ferry was put into operation and a treadway bridge was under construction. By 1200 the 3rd Battalion had put most of its troops across the Canal, and one company across the River. Co B 737 Tank Battalion and Co B 654th TD Battalion forded the River with the mission of assisting the 1st Battalion in cleaning out enemy troops between the River and Phase Line 1.

On 12 September 1944 the 320th Infantry (minus the 2nd Battalion which was attached to Co A, 4th Armored Division) closed in an assembly area near Bois-De-Ormes at 0800, and prepared to follow the 137th Infantry across the River.

On 13 September 1944 the 1135th Engineer Group was supporting the 35th Infantry Division. The 134th Infantry (with Co A 60th Engineer (C) Battalion attached and Co A 654th TD Battalion in support) continued the occupation of Fort De Pont St. Vincent, receiving considerable small arms, mortar and artillery fire. The 3rd Battalion continued to patrol the west bank of the Moselle River drawing small arms and 20mm fire from the east side of the River in vicinity of Flavigny.

The 137th Infantry (with B 60th Engineer (C) Battalion and Co B 737 Tank Battalion attached, and Co B 654th TD in support) completed crossings of the Moselle River at 1800 on 12 September 1944. At 2150 the 2nd Battalion had secured a town on the east side of the River. During the late afternoon of 12 September the 1st Battalion, assisted by Co B 737 Tank Battalion, smashed a counter-attack by enemy armor and infantry near Domptail. Numerous armored vehicles were destroyed and ammunition dumps at Domptail set on fire.

The 320th Infantry (minus the 2nd Battalion, with Co C 737th Tank Battalion attached and Co C 654th TD Battalion in support) crossed the Moselle River on 13 September 1944 at 0800 and attacked north and east on the right flank of the 137 Infantry against artillery, mortar and small arms fire.

On 14 September 1944 the CT 134 (minus the 2nd Battalion 134th Infantry) (with the 161 F.A. Battalion; Co A 60 Engineer (C) Battalion; Co A 654 TD Battalion; one Company 110 Medical Battalion; one Battery 448 AAA AW Battalion attached) was attached to XII Corps Task Force S, under command of Brigadier General Edmund B. Sebree, and at 0715 began a movement to an assembly area east of Toul. The 2nd Battalion 134th Infantry (with 127 F.A. Bn in support) set up patrols and defense lines to protect the Division's north flank from Fort De Pont St. Vincent, inclusive, along the southwest bank of the Moselle River to the bridge.

The 137th Infantry (with Co B 60th Engineer (C) Battalion; Co A and two Platoons of Co D and one Platoon assault guns 737th Tank Battalion attached, and Co B 654 TD Battalion in support) continued to expand the bridgehead across the Moselle River. The 320th Infantry (minus the 2d Battalion) (with Co C 737th Tank Battalion and Co C 60th Engineer (C) Battalion attached and Co C 654th TD Battalion is support) continued also to expand their portion of the bridgehead across the Moselle River.

At 1200 the 2d Bn 134th Infantry and 35th Cavalry Recon Troop were attached to the 127th F.A. Battalion to form Task Force T, under the command of Lt. Col. Robert Thompson, CO, 127 F.A. Bn, with the mission of protecting the west bank of the Moselle River from Fort De Pont St. Vincent south.

On 15 September 1944 the 137th Infantry (with Co B 60th Engineer (C) Battalion; Co A and two Platoons Co D and one platoon of assault guns from the 737th Tank Battalion attached, and Co B 654th TD in support) cleaned out the woods of Bois De Flavigny, and advanced to the southwest bank of the Meurthe River, sending patrols across the river to reconnoiter. At 1200 the 1st Battalion was attempting to cross the River in assault boats in the vicinity of St. Nicholas, and was receiving machine gun fire from the high ground east of the River and northeast of St. Nicholas.

The 320th Infantry (minus the 2d Battalion) (with Co C 737th Tank Battalion and Co C 60th Engineer (C) Battalion attached, and Co C 654th TD Battalion in support) crossed the Meurthe River at and south of Rosieres, and were receiving machine gun fire from high ground north of Dombasle.

On 15 September 1944 at about 1030 Brigadier General Sebree, Commander of Task Force S accompanied by Colonel Robert Ellsworth, entered the city of Nancy and were followed by the Task Force which liberated the city.

CT 134, released at 1200 from attachment to Task Force S, reverted to Division control. Task Force S was dissolved. At the same time the 2d Battalion was released from attachment to Task Force T and reverted to CT Control. The CT continued to clean up snipers in Nancy and vicinity.

The 320th Infantry (minus the 2d Battalion) (with Co C 737th Tank Battalion and Co C 60th Engineer (C) Battalion attached) crossed the Le Sanon River at Dombasle during the afternoon of 15 September 1944 and occupied and defended the high ground north of Dombasle and Summerviller. By early morning 16 September all the combat elements were across the Le Sanon River. At 1200 the Regiment was attacking to the north in a column of battalions with the 3d Battalion leading.

The 137th Infantry (with Co B 60th Engineer (C) Battalion; Co A and two Platoons of Co D and one platoon assault guns 737th Tank Battalion attached, and Co B 654 TD Battalion in support) prepared to cross the Meurthe River in assault boats on the morning of 16 September 1944, and by 1200 the 2d Battalion was on the east bank of the River opposed by heavy machine gun and mortar fire. The 1st Battalion had one company on the east bank of the River and secured Varangeville. The attached tanks and TDs had crossed the Le Sanon River at Summerville at 0800, and at 1200 were moving along the east bank of the Meurthe River to support the 2d Battalion.

On 16 September 1944 the CT 134 (with the 161 F.A. Battalion; Co A 60th Engineer (C) Battalion; Co A 654th TD Battalion; Co A 110 Medical Battalion and one Battery AAA AW Battalion attached) crossed the Meurthe River at two points at 1600, and by 1715 had the 3d Battalion and half of the 1st Battalion east of the river. By 1200 the next day the organic vehicles of the 3d Battalion had crossed the River and all foot elements of the 1st Battalion were east of the River. The 3d Battalion immediately attacked to the northeast to secure high ground near Essey. The 1st Battalion drove east against small arms and artillery fire. On the same date the 2d Battalion 134th Infantry flushed the woods west of Nancy.

During the afternoon of 16 September 1944 the 137th Infantry (with Co B 60th Engineer (C) Battalion; Co A and two platoons of Co D and one platoon assault guns 737th Tank Battalion attached, and Co B 654th TD Bn in support) crossed the remainder of its troops to the east side of the Meurthe River. At 1200 there was a counter-attack against the 2nd Battalion in the vicinity of Chartreuse by ten tanks, each accompanied by from 50 to 75 foot troops. The counter-attack was stopped by the combined fire of our TDs, tanks and nine Battalions of artillery. Seven enemy tanks were destroyed. Since this counter-attack was seen by Division Field Artillery cub air planes approximately one mile from our lines, the enemy never succeeded in reaching our positions. On 17 September 1944 at 0700 the 1st and 2d Battalions attacked to the northeast against small arms fire.

The 2d Battalion 320th Infantry was released from attachment to CCB 4th Armored Division on 16 September 1944 at 2000.

During the afternoon of 16 September 1944 the 3d Battalion 320th Infantry continued to drive north against heavy mortar and small arms fire and by 1700 it had occupied positions 300 yards south of Boissoncourt. The town was seized along with 106 prisoners at 2000. At 1740 on the same day the 1st Battalion 320th Infantry moved from the high ground north of Dombasle to a position south of Harancourt. On 17 September 1944 at 0800 the 1st Battalion moved through the 3rd Battalion, attacking to the north. At 0830 the 2nd Battalion 320th Infantry started moving north toward Remerville from the vicinity of Drouville. By 1200 the 1st Battalion was in Erbeviller.

During the period from 1200 on 16 September 1944 to 1200 on 17 September 1944 the 654th TD Battalion destroyed 3 Mark VI Tanks, 3 long-barreled S.P. guns, 13 machine guns and one mortar.

On 17 September 1944 at 1730 the CT 134 (with the 161st F.A. Battalion; Co B 737th Tank Battalion; Co A 654th TD Battalion; Co A 60th Engineer (C) Battalion; Co A 110th Medical Battalion and two Batteries 448th AAA AW Battalion attached) was attached to Task Force S with CCB 6th Armored Division under XII Corps control. Task Force S was commanded by Brigadier General Edmund B. Sebree, and its mission was to operate north of Nancy to clear the enemy from the Bois De La Rumont and the Bois De Faulx.

The 137th Infantry (with Co B 60th Enginer (C) Battalion; two platoons Co D and one platoon assault guns 737th Tank Battalion attached, and Co B 654th TD Bn in support) continued to expand the bridgehead across the Meurthe River against scattered enemy resistance, including tanks and artillery fire. At 1200 on 18 September 1944 the 1st Battalion was holding the high ground west of Cerrveil with mortar and artillery fire being thrown against them.

On 17 September 1944 the 320th Infantry (with Co C 737th Tank Battalion and Co C 60th Engineer (C) Battalion attached, and Co C 654th TD Battalion in support) continued its attack to the north against scattered resistance and closed into an assembly area in the vicinity of Mazerulles at 2355.

On 18 September 1944 Task Force S continued to attack north of Nancy mopping up the territory, and was dissolved on 19 September 1944 at 1230.

The 134th Infantry was released from attachment to Task Force S upon dissolving of the Task Force. The Regiment continued to hold positions northeast of Nancy despite heavy counter-attacks. Part of Agincourt was reoccupied by the enemy.

CT 320 was attached to the 4th Armored Division on 19 September 1944 at 1230, and moved to join the 4th Armored Division on 20 September 1944 at 0930.

On 19 September 1944 at 1330 the 137th Infantry (with Co C, two platoons of Co D, and 1 platoon assault guns, 737th Tank Battalion attached) attacked to the north, 2nd and 3rd Battalions abreast, with the mission of seizing the high ground in the vicinity of Amance. By 1830 both battalions had reached the highway running east from Nancy and were halted by heavy machine gun, mortar and small arms fire. On 20 September 1944 at 0545, the 2nd and 3rd battalions resumed the attack and immediately hit strong resistance in the woods north of the highway. The 1st Battalion, 137th Infantry, moved to the assembly area in reserve during the morning of 20 September 1944. By 1200 elements of Companies I and L were in the woods north of the highway; the remainder of the 2nd and 3rd Battalions were pinned down by small arms, mortar and artillery fire. The 2nd and 3rd Battalions continued to attack north of the highway through the afternoon of 20 September 1944. Heavy field fortifications with overhead cover, roving guns, mortar fire and extremely heavy small arms fire were met by both battalions, and by 1200 on 21 September 1944, no appreciable gains had been made. The 1st Battalion continued in reserve, protecting the left flank of the Regiment.

On 21 September 1944, the 134th Infantry continued to hold the high ground northeast of Nancy and sent patrols to the vicinity Bouxieres and Lay-St. Christophe, determining the presence of the enemy in considerable numbers at both positions.

On 21 September 1944, at 1000, the CCB, 6th Armored Division, was attached to the 35th Infantry Division, and began moving from Luneville to an assembly area south of Jallaucourt.

On 22 September 1944, the 134th Infantry sent patrols north of the railroad in its sector and prepared to attack to the north on Division Order.

The 137th Infantry (with Co A and 2 platoons of Co D, and 1 platoon of assault guns, 737th Tank Battalion attached) prepared to attack on Division order.

CCB, 6th Armored Division, moved from its assembly area to attack southwest at 0700, 22 September 1944, and at 1015 two tank columns were in positions at Armacourt and Aboncourt and were moving south. The columns advanced against scattered resistance consisting of AT fire and scattered groups of infantry. Blown bridges, however, impeded their progress considerably.

The 1st Battalion, 134th Infantry, attacked at 1200 against enemy on high ground northeast of Lay-St. Christophe and the 2nd Battalion, 134th Infantry, attacked at 1200 to gain the high ground north of Bouxieres. Extremely heavy AW, mortar and rifle fire was met by both battalions. The battalions reached their objectives about 2300. Bouxieres, Lay-St. Christophe and Eulmont were occupied by 1200, on 23 September 1944. The 3rd Battalion, 134th Infantry, occupied Hill 356 and Agincourt.

On 22 September 1944, at 1200, the 137th Infantry (with Co A, 737th Tank Battalion attached) attacked with the 2nd and 3rd Battalions abreast, with Co C riding on tanks, to make an initial assault around the right flank. The 2nd and 3rd Battalions, and Co C, entered the woods against scattered opposition. The attack of this Regiment to the north was delayed by Division order until the effect of CCB, 6th Armored Division attacking southwest could be felt by the enemy. The result was disaster to the enemy. In the late afternoon the remainder of the 1st Battalion was committed to assist in cleaning out the woods, and by dark two-thirds of the woods had been cleared. During the night of 22 - 23 September 1944, Co G took and secured the town of Amance and the high ground in the vicinity. During the morning of 23 September 1944, the Regiment continued cleaning the woods of personnel mines, road blocks and booby-traps.

On 23 September 1944, CCB 6th Armored Division, was slowed somewhat in its advance by heavy ground fog and blown bridges enroute. It cleaned up pockets of resistance along the route and captured 350 prisoners. At 1200, 23 September 1944, CCB was advancing to secure Leyr.

The Division organic artillery, supported by reinforcing artillery, fired in support of the Division attack on 22 September 1944, with numerous TOT missions in the zone of advance of the 134th and 137th Infantry Regiments. Devastating artillery fire was placed on large forces of the enemy in the open when the German resistance cracked early in the afternoon of 22 September 1944. The targets consisted of enemy batteries, enemy columns on the road, and enemy troop concentrations of company size and larger. During the afternoon of 23 September 1944, all fires were observed. Artillery liaison plane observers were particularly effective in the adjustment of a large percentage of the fire missions.

The first squadron of P-47 planes contacted by the Air support Officer on the afternoon of 22 September 1944 dropped bombs on emplacements in the vicinity of Amance, and were then sent to check the north-south road west of Amance. The squadron discovered large numbers of camouflaged vehicles parked in towns, and on the east slopes of hills from Leyr north. The squadron strafed these vehicles until its gas and ammunition were expended. A request was sent to XII Corps for additional flights, and two squadrons and part of a third were directed against these targets, and against retreating columns moving north, composed of motor and horse-drawn vehicles and guns. The result of this close coordination between air and ground forces caused rout among the retreating Germans.

The 35th Infantry Division took all objectives assigned to it on September 22 and 23. The 134th Infantry advancing against an estimated force of one regiment destroyed large amounts of enemy materiel, and forced the enemy troops north inflicting severe casualties on them. The 137th Infantry entered the heavily fortified Foret Le Champenoux, which had been occupied by at least one enemy regiment with several tanks. The enemy was forced to withdraw from the forest with heavy casualties. The artillery and CCB, 6th Armored Division, destroyed large numbers of enemy vehicles, guns and personnel as the enemy retreated to the north. The Division captured 689 prisoners of war and 63 vehicles in addition to other miscellaneous enemy materiel.

During the afternoon of 23rd September 1944 CCB 6th Armored Division secured the towns of Leyr, Armaucourt, Aboncourt and Han. Light forces holding Adoncourt were pushed south by strong enemy forces during the night of 23 - 24 September 1944.

The 134th Infantry (minus the 1st Battalion) cleaned out the Bois De Faulk during the afternoon of 23 September 1944. The 3rd Battalion relieved the CCB 6th Armored Division in securing Leyr, and established patrols between Leyr and the 137th Infantry at 0500 on 24 September 1944.

On 24 September 1944 the CCB 6th Armored Division was released from attachment to the 35th Infantry Division at 0630; the 1st Battalion 134th Infantry was attached to the 6th Armored Division at 1030; CT 320, released from attachment to the 4th Armored Division, reverted to 35th Infantry Division Control at 1100. The 1117th Engineer Group supported the Division.

On 24 September 1944 the 137th Infantry (with Co A 737th Tank Battalion attached) completed cleaning up the Foret De St. Jean Fontaine.

On 25 - 26 September 1944 the 35th Infantry Division relieved the 6th Armored Division and the 4th Armored Division within the 35th Infantry Division Sector and established defensive positions.

On 26 September 1944 at 1800 the 137th Infantry (with the 1st Battalion 320th Infantry and Co C 737th Tank Battalion attached) repelled an enemy attack from the vicinity of Courtures. The following day at 1100 the Regiment encountered enemy armor and infantry that penetrated Pattencourt.

On 27 September 1944 the 134th Infantry occupied positions and maintained contact with the 80th Infantry Division. The 320th Infantry remained in Corps Reserve. During the afternoon of 27 September 1944 the 134th Infantry repelled an enemy attack on Manhoue by an estimated company of enemy infantry. The Regiment drove back similar attacks on Manhoue and southwest of Jallaucourt on the morning of 28 September 1944. The Regiment continued to defend and to maintain contact with the 80th Infantry Division and the 44th Armored Infantry (6th Armored Division) on its left, and the 137th Infantry on the right.

On 28 September 1944 the 137th Infantry (with the 1st Battalion 320th Infantry and Co C 737th Tank Battalion attached) was successful in repelling enemy armor, supported by infantry, in attempts to penetrate from the east to Pattencourt and Gremecey and from the northeast into the woods.

On 29 September 1944 the 1st and 2nd Battalions of the 134th Infantry continue to improve their defensive positions. Two enemy attacks were repelled; one in the vicinity of Manhoue, the other in the vicinity of Jallaucourt. There was considerable mortar and artillery fire.

On 28 September 1944 the 137th Infantry (with the 1st Battalion 320th Infantry and Co C of the 737th Tank Battalion attached) discovered that enemy penetrations had been accomplished in the woods northeast of Gremecy. A considerable number of the enemy infiltrated into the rear of the 3d Battalion. The 1st Battalion 320th Infantry reinforced the position of the 3d Battalion 137th Infantry. The enemy continued to reinforce his gains and the 3rd Battalion 137th Infantry was committed to hold Hill 282 and clean up the enemy groups to the rear. The enemy pressure forced the 1st Battalion 320th Infantry to withdraw about 1000 yards. A counter-attack by Co C 737th Tank Battalion accompanied by the Infantry, restored the position and drove the enemy from the rear of the 1st Battalion 320th Infantry. All troops were in contact and reorganize by nightfall. Enemy concentrations to the front being reported by forward observers, the Artillery shelled the positions. The Regiment, reinforced, jumped off at 0500 on 29 September 1944 to retake the forward edge of the Foret De Gremecey. Some enemy infiltration took place in the 3rd Battalion area during the morning of 29 September 1944.

The 320th Infantry (minus the 1st Battalion and with the Co B 737th Tank Battalion and one Platoon Co D 737th Tank Battalion attached) reverted to Division control from Corps Reserve on 28 September 1944 at 1600. The Regiment was ordered to attack with one Battalion on 29 September 1944 at 0430 from the vicinity of the hill northeast along the road to secure the east edge of the Foret De Gremecey, between the 134th and 137th Infantries. At 1200 the 3d Battalion had reached the objective and contact was being made with the adjacent units.

During the afternoon of 28 September 1944 there was firing by the organic and reinforcing artillery units of the 35th Infantry Division on targets of opportunity consisting of enemy troop concentrations and tanks. During the night of 28 - 29 September 1944 there was interdiction and harassing fire by the light Artillery Battalions. On 29 September 1944 at 0455 there was a ten minute fire in preparation of the Division attack by the entire regrouped artillery. At 0600 all battalions were massing fires on Hill 282 and roads leading south from Fresnes-En-Saulnois, successfully breaking up the enemy attack.

Fighter-bombers bombed and strafed targets in the Chateau Salinschambrey area on the afternoon of 28 September 1944. Missions were flown approximately every hour on the morning of 29 September 1944 and targets were hit in the vicinity of the towns of Chambrey, Jallaucourt, Salins, Mallaucourt Sur Seille and Fresnes.

On 29 September 1944 the 134th Infantry continued to improve its defensive positions. The 2d Battalion cleaned up the town of Han during the afternoon. During the evening the 3d Battalion established contact with the 320th Infantry on the right. On 30 September 1944 at 0530 the enemy attacked with forces estimated to be at least two companies. The 1st and 2d Battalions continued the defense of the sector, receiving heavy artillery and mortar fire. Co A was committed to the 3d Battalion area to clear out infiltration during the afternoon of 30 September 1944. The 3d Battalion reestablished the break in its line and continued to mop up the infiltration resulting from the enemy's morning attack on 29 September 1944.

The 137th Infantry (with Co C 737th Tank Battalion attached) repulsed repeated counter-attacks against their defensive positions during the afternoon of 29 September 1944. The Regiment attacked on 30 September 1944 0630 to reestablish the positions left on 29 September 1944. Heavy casualties were sustained throughout the afternoon of 30 September 1944 from enemy infiltrations through the Foret De Gremecey and from extremely heavy artillery fire. The 2d Battalion's line was extremely thin and the advance of the enemy in that sector was stopped by committing the 133d Engineer (C) Battalion to reinforce the line on Hill 282 North of Pettoncourt. During the night the 3d Battalion 137th Infantry was relieved by the 320th Infantry.

The 1st Battalion 320th Infantry was released to Regimental control at 2300 on 29 September 1944. On 30 September 1944 at 0630 it attacked in an effort to reestablish the line along the east edge of the Foret De Gremecey. The attack continued through the forest during the afternoon against heavy enemy resistance accompanied by artillery and mortar fire. There were no appreciable gains.

The 2d Battalion 320th Infantry remained in Division Reserve on 29 September 1944 but on 30 September 1944, at 1330, was committed to contain enemy penetrations. Moving through extremely heavy enemy artillery fire, it reached its positions at 2230 and established a defensive line.

The 3d Battalion 320th Infantry occupied the line along the northeast corner of the Foret De Gremecey on 29 September 1944, and during the afternoon and evening established contact with the 134th Infantry. On 30 September 1944 at 0630 it began the mission of clearing the woods east of its position, against heavy mortar and artillery fire.

Co A 737th Tank Battalion was attached to the 320th Infantry during the afternoon of 30 September 1944.

During the period 26 - 30 September 1944, it is believed that the Division, holding a front of 18,000 yards, was attacked by two German Divisions. The lines held firm in most places. At the close of this report the loss of ground was approximately 2000 yards only in the Foret De Gremecey. The Division attacked on 1 October 1944 in conjunction with the 6th Armored Division and restored all positions.

3. Casualties sustained by the 35th Division during the period were as follows:

 

Type of Casualty Officers Enlisted Men Officers (July, Aug and Sept) Enlisted Men (July, Aug and Sept)
Killed in Action 20 280 72 978
Died of Wounds 6 45 16 169
Missing in Action 6 257 18 690
Died of Injury 0 0 0 2
Seriously Wounded in Action 5 104 24 334
Seriously Injured in Action 0 4 0 5
Slightly Wounded in Action 53 991 201 3,898
Slightly Injured in Action 3 118 13 380
TOTALS 93 1,799 334 6,466

4. The Total number of Prisoners of War captured by the 35th Infantry Division during the period was 2554. Total for July, August, and September was 7011.

5. The Total number of decorations and awards made to members of the 35th Infantry Division during the period is as follows:

Officers Enlisted Men
Silver Star Medal 34 47
Silver Star Oak Leaf Cluster 1 0
Bronze Star Medal 88 245
Bronze Star Medal Oak Leaf Cluster 3 5
Purple Heart 10 209
Purple Heart Oak Leaf Cluster 4 12
Air Medal 3 0
Air Meda Oak Leaf Cluster 3 1

Copies of the General Orders making such award are attached hereto.

For the Commanding General:

<signed>

Richard G. Chadwick
Lt. Col., A. G. D.
Adjutant General

5 Incls.
Incl 1 General Orders No 28 thru 38, Hq 35th Div.
Incl 2 G-1 Journal with supporting documents.
Incl 3 G-2 Journal with supporting documents.
Incl 4 G-3 Journal with supporting documents.
Incl 5 G-4 Journal with supporting documents.
After Action Report
September 1944
Annex to G-1 Journal

Battle Casualties (From BCR's)

 

Unit KIA DOW DOI SWA SIA LWA LIA MIA TOTAL
Hq 35th Inf Div 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1
Hq Sp Trs, Band, & Med Det 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
MP Plat 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Hq Co 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
35th Sig Co 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2
35th Rcn Tr 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
35th QM Co 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
735th Ord Co 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1
110th Med Bn 3 0 0 1 0 5 0 0 9
60th Engr Bn 5 1 0 0 0 6 2 2 16
134th Inf 121 16 0 47 4 430 55 260 933
137th Inf 106 19 0 31 0 344 31 4 535
320th Inf 52 10 0 28 0 222 21 0 333
Hq, Hq Btry, & Med Det, 35th Div Arty 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
127th FA Bn 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
161st FA Bn 1 0 0 1 0 4 0 0 6

216th FA Bn

0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2
219th FA Bn 5 0 0 0 0 6 1 0 12
DIV TOTAL 293 47 0 109 4 1,018 113 266 1,850

 

ATTACHED UNITS KIA DOW DOI SWA SIA LWA LIA MIA TOTAL
448th AAA AW Bn 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2
654th TD Bn 3 3 0 1 0 14 4 3 28
737th Tk Bn 4 0 0 0 0 11 4 0 19
TOTAL 7 3 0 2 0 26 8 3 49

Prisoners of War Captured
September 1944

Date PWs Captured Date PWs Captured
1 Sept 22 16 Sept 230
2 Sept 3 17 Sept 296
3 Sept 42 18 Sept 74
4 Sept 8 19 Sept 44
5 Sept 64 20 Sept 159
6 Sept 1 21 Sept 35
7 Sept 5 22 Sept 152
8 Sept 1 23 Sept 586
9 Sept 3 24 Sept 104
10 Sept 2 25 Sept 36
11 Sept 1 26 Sept 15
12 Sept 34 27 Sept 105
13 Sept 141 28 Sept 26
14 Sept 97 29 Sept 94
15 Sept 82 30 Sept 101

Total Prisoners of War Captured for Month - 2563

Replacements

 

Date Replacements Received Date Replacements Received
1 Sept 64 16 Sept 177
2 Sept 22 17 Sept 274
3 Sept 0 18 Sept 63
4 Sept 53 19 Sept 26
5 Sept 243 20 Sept 207
6 Sept 172 21 Sept 547
7 Sept 96 22 Sept 117
8 Sept 3 23 Sept 144
9 Sept 6 24 Sept 148
10 Sept 46 25 Sept 1
11 Sept 193 26 Sept 168
12 Sept 0 27 Sept 11
13 Sept 181 28 Sept 72
14 Sept 1 29 Sept 0
15 Sept 110 30 Sept 276

Total Replacements Received during Month - 3421

Awards
Awarded by This Headquarters

Silver Star Medal

Regular Post Cluster
Officers 26 7 1
Enlisted Med 33 13 1

Bronze Star Medal

Regular Post Cluster
Officers 87 2 3
Enlisted Med 221 17 7

Air Medal

Regular Cluster
Officers 3 3
Enlisted Med 0 1

Purple Heart Awards

Purple Heart Award - 218
Cluster - 17

Awarded by Higher Headquarters

Distinguished Service Cross
Officers: Regular - 1; Posthumous - 1
Enlisted Men: Regular - 4; Posthumous - 1

Transcribed by Roberta V. Russo
Palatine, IL

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